adverve:

‘People You May Know’

Facebook Stories gives us this awesome tale of one Mayank Sharma. In 2010, the New Delhi resident contracted tubercular meningitis and spent a week at hospital, after which he emerged with zero memory of his illness — or the first 27 years of his life.

To put the pieces back together, he started messaging people who popped up under Facebook’s “People You May Know” feature.

We love this because it’s strange to imagine that so much of who we “are” is the result of projections by others. But maybe that’s why we can’t shake Facebook, even on days — or weeks, or months — that we patently hate it.

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 5 notes.
good:

In Event of Moon Disaster

A speech was prepared by Nixon’s speechwriter William Safire in case of a tragedy that, thankfully, never occurred.

via Buzzfeed

good:

In Event of Moon Disaster

A speech was prepared by Nixon’s speechwriter William Safire in case of a tragedy that, thankfully, never occurred.

via Buzzfeed

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 125 notes.

Thoughts on Jack Dorsey, by Steve Jobs

stevejobsspirit:

Jack,
I have no problem with your success. You’ve earned your success; for the most part. The problem is, you wholesale ripped off my identity. Grand theft. I don’t mean that in a small way, I mean that in a big way. You are not just trying to be the next me, you are trying to be me. I’m already up to my ass with these Android bozos, but willing to go thermonuclear to right your wrong too. 

Here are just a few examples.


glasses


getting fired

Me   I feel like somebody just punched me in the stomach. Playboy, Sept ‘87
You  It was like being punched in the stomach. Vanity Fair, April ‘11

no one has done this before


surprise and delight


magical

You Payment is another form of communication..but it’s never felt magical. Vanity Fair, April ‘11

we’re just people running this company


proud of the things we haven’t done


put it on the shelf


editor in chief


the comma



Catch my drift? Stop trying to be me. Stop trying to be the next me. Be the first Jack Dorsey. Your time is limited, so don’t waste it living my life. Don’t be trapped by dogma, which is living with the result of my thinking.


Steve

Sent from the iClouds in a galaxy far, far away….

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 189 notes.

tomorrowmag:

Our resident Olympics fan explains why she hopes American women don’t perform as well in the Olympics of tomorrow:

megangreenwell:

The #girlpower headlines are everywhere: “Year of the Woman at the Olympic Games? For Americans, It’s True.” “U.S. Female Olympians Have Won More Medal Points Than All But Four Countries.” The weirdest: “U.S. Domination of Women’s Sports Proves Power of Positive Thinking.”

When the Olympics began two weeks ago, the headlines were about the slight gender imbalance on the U.S. team—more women than men for the first time ever. As the Games close today, the storyline has shifted to focus on the huge number of medals those women have won (about two-thirds of the total U.S. haul). On every social media platform, I’ve seen dozens of smart feminists post these stories with triumphant messages.

But labeling the U.S. women’s Olympic blitz an unequivocal feminist success demonstrates a misunderstanding of the international sports world. U.S. women didn’t win more medals because they’re better than their male counterparts. They won more medals because they’re better than their (female) competitors from other countries. And unless your feminism applies only to Americans, that’s not something to celebrate.

The (relatively) low number of medals for U.S. men demonstrates (relative) parity in men’s sports. There are still events in which the big, bad Americans win easily (watching some of those early-round basketball games was a joke), but there are more in which they are playing against tough competitors from even small, developing countries. All but a handful of nations have dramatically fewer sports resources than the U.S., but they usually find ways to support their top male athletes. It’s much more rare to see that sort of commitment to women.

The trailblazing Saudi Arabian 800m runner Sarah Attar would not have qualified for the Olympics if she’d had any competition from outside her own country. When she did compete on the world stage, she finished a distant last in her qualifying heat. And that makes sense! She’s never had resources or high-level training. She doesn’t have predecessors to emulate and surpass. Attar is obviously the extreme example, but the number of countries where women are taken seriously as athletes is shockingly small. When we celebrate the U.S. women’s gaudy medal total, we’re celebrating the fact that women are more oppressed elsewhere. Hearing a little less of the Star Spangled Banner during Sochi 2014 would be the true sign of progress.

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 85 notes.

I was shown how fragile life was on Saturday. I saw the terror on bystanders’ faces. I saw the victims of a senseless crime. I saw lives change. I was reminded that we don’t know when or where our time on Earth will end. When or where we will breathe our last breath. For one man, it was in the middle of a busy food court on a Saturday evening.

I say all the time that every moment we have to live our life is a blessing. So often I have found myself taking it for granted. Every hug from a family member. Every laugh we share with friends. Even the times of solitude are all blessings. Every second of every day is a gift. After Saturday evening, I know I truly understand how blessed I am for each second I am given.

I feel like I am overreacting about what I experienced. But I can’t help but be thankful for whatever caused me to make the choices that I made that day. My mind keeps replaying what I saw over in my head. I hope the victims make a full recovery. I wish I could shake this odd feeling from my chest. The feeling that’s reminding me how blessed I am. The same feeling that made me leave the Eaton Center. The feeling that may have potentially saved my life.

Jessica Redfield (real last name: Ghawi) was shot and killed last night at a midnight screening of ‘The Dark Knight Rises,’ along with 11 others when a gunman opened fire in a theater. The above is from her blog, written in June, after she narrowly escaped another senseless shooting at a mall in Toronto. (via newsweek)

(via zooeydeschanel)

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 24,247 notes.
themadeshop:

personettes:

nathanjohnson:

Hey everyone… really excited to bring you the first taste of the score for Looper!!!
Click above for a little peek into how we created the “Time Machine” cue.

Holy shit!
This is unlike anything I’ve ever heard before. It completely sets the tone for the film, completely atmospheric and utterly gripping and gritty. Nathan’s process is really impressive. Everyone should give this a listen! I can’t wait for Looper!

Wow. Okay, yeah — you should all check this out. (With headphones on (!))

themadeshop:

personettes:

nathanjohnson:

Hey everyone… really excited to bring you the first taste of the score for Looper!!!

Click above for a little peek into how we created the “Time Machine” cue.

Holy shit!

This is unlike anything I’ve ever heard before. It completely sets the tone for the film, completely atmospheric and utterly gripping and gritty. Nathan’s process is really impressive. Everyone should give this a listen! I can’t wait for Looper!

Wow. Okay, yeah — you should all check this out. (With headphones on (!))

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 130 notes.
theatlantic:

Last Night, San Diego Accidentally Set Off All Its Fourth Of July Fireworks at Once
[Image: Ben Baller/Instagram]

theatlantic:

Last Night, San Diego Accidentally Set Off All Its Fourth Of July Fireworks at Once

[Image: Ben Baller/Instagram]

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 2,916 notes.
theatlantic:

Facebook Rolls Out New Icons for Same-Sex Marriages

Mazel tov! If you are married to your same-sex partner, and share these types of things on Facebook, no more second-class iconography for you. Facebook has rolled out little icons — in, of course, that distinct Facebook-blue — that will appear in timelines to mark the weddings of same-sex couples.
Read more. [Image: Facebook]

theatlantic:

Facebook Rolls Out New Icons for Same-Sex Marriages

Mazel tov! If you are married to your same-sex partner, and share these types of things on Facebook, no more second-class iconography for you. Facebook has rolled out little icons — in, of course, that distinct Facebook-blue — that will appear in timelines to mark the weddings of same-sex couples.

Read more. [Image: Facebook]

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 274 notes.

loopermovie:

Our new full US trailer is online - share and enjoy!

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 911 notes.
theatlantic:

Does It Matter If the Heroine of Brave Is Gay?

Merida really could be gay. She could be straight. She could be asexual. We just don’t know. Over the course of the film, she shows romantic interest in neither boys nor girls; it’s only by assumption that her parents—and, presumably, most viewers—think she’s heterosexual.
Is this ambiguity intentional? Almost definitely. Pixar is notoriously meticulous—the Easter eggs and subtle references in each of its works are legion—and it’s unlikely that the filmmakers simply didn’t think to give Merida any sort of love interest. No, this is a deliberate sort of ambiguity. With that in mind, here are five ways of looking at Pixar’s motivations for being so coy:
Brave is about a daughter’s relationship with her mother, and sexuality would only distract from the developments within that relationship.
She is gay, and Brave is Pixar’s subversive way to put a lesbian in one of its movies.
Merida is a straight girl who likes to run and shoot and fight.
She’s neither gay nor straight; she’s asexual. (This would be just as sexually radical—if not more so—than making Merida a lesbian.)
The ambiguity is itself a message.
Read more. [Image: Pixar]




(Spoiler Alert, of course)

theatlantic:

Does It Matter If the Heroine of Brave Is Gay?

Merida really could be gay. She could be straight. She could be asexual. We just don’t know. Over the course of the film, she shows romantic interest in neither boys nor girls; it’s only by assumption that her parents—and, presumably, most viewers—think she’s heterosexual.

Is this ambiguity intentional? Almost definitely. Pixar is notoriously meticulous—the Easter eggs and subtle references in each of its works are legion—and it’s unlikely that the filmmakers simply didn’t think to give Merida any sort of love interest. No, this is a deliberate sort of ambiguity. With that in mind, here are five ways of looking at Pixar’s motivations for being so coy:

  1. Brave is about a daughter’s relationship with her mother, and sexuality would only distract from the developments within that relationship.
  2. She is gay, and Brave is Pixar’s subversive way to put a lesbian in one of its movies.
  3. Merida is a straight girl who likes to run and shoot and fight.
  4. She’s neither gay nor straight; she’s asexual. (This would be just as sexually radical—if not more so—than making Merida a lesbian.)
  5. The ambiguity is itself a message.

Read more. [Image: Pixar]


(Spoiler Alert, of course)
This was posted 1 year ago. It has 1,132 notes.